How Second-Tier Cities Sell Luxury Travel and 13 Other Tourism Trends This Week

21c Museum Hotels

A rendering of a room in the new 21c Museum Hotel in Oklahoma City, a potential new luxury market. 21c Museum Hotels

Skift Take: These are the tourism trends we were talking about this week.

— Sarah Enelow

Throughout the week we post dozens of original stories, connecting the dots across the travel industry, and every weekend we sum it all up. This weekend roundup examines tourism.

For all of our weekend roundups, go here.

>>Now’s your chance to save on our fourth annual Skift Global Forum: Save With Early Bird Tickets to Skift Global Forum NYC

>>At a time when climate change is already affecting destinations and scientific research is under attack in many parts of the world, millions of travelers — lured by their love of local foods — help make agritourism a factor that tourism boards can’t ignore: Local Food Trend Keeps Farms at Center of Tourism Strategies

>>At the same time that many companies are implementing more traveler-friendly policies in order to make life better for their business travelers, fear and anxiety caused by politics and safety issues may be undercutting those gains: Business Travelers Are Stressed About Safety and Work-Life Balance

>>The luxury market is leaning heavily on emerging markets’ growing incomes and aspirational lifestyles, so it must be prepared to weather changes in this demand by keeping personalization and authenticity at the forefront: Luxury Travel Spending From Emerging Markets Will Slow in Coming Years

>>Well-appointed luxury comes at less than a premium in smaller markets, and it’s an excellent entry point to demonstrate high-quality hospitality for a new generation of travelers put off by high-priced glitz: Second- and Third-Tier Cities Have a New Way of Selling Luxury Travel

>>China’s neighbors stand to benefit most from hundreds of millions of Chinese tourists. But as the past few months have shown, Chinese demand can shift rapidly: 5 Charts Showing How Chinese Travelers Have Boosted Asia-Pacific Tourism

>>This is not your grandfather’s keynote. Choosing the right speaker to engage an audience is more complex than ever before: What Are Conferences Looking for in a Speaker? Interactivity and Sensitivity

>>Finding the best speakers for a meeting or event involves much more than asking whether they’ll be entertaining or not: The Next-Gen Conference Speaker Is Sensitive — Meetings Innovation Report

>>Six Flags Entertainment is continuing to look for ways to bring visitors to its parks without shelling out a ton of money on expensive new construction: Six Flags Is Adding Water Parks to Wring More Money From Visitors

>>Tourists plan entire trips around food with increasing frequency. This has changed the idea of a restaurant as travelers seek immersive dining experiences outside of the traditional seated dinner: Video: Noma and VizEat COOs Explain the Changing Dynamic of Food Tourism

>>While emerging economies in Asia and Africa will see the greatest business travel increase over the next decade, according to WTTC forecasts, the U.S. and China will remain the largest global business travel markets: Emerging Markets Will Drive Business Travel Growth Over Next Decade

>>Travel managers and buyers are looking for fresh solutions to improve quality of life for their travelers: Corporate Travel Leaders Try to Change the Conversation — Skift Corporate Travel Innovation Report

>>Our New Luxury newsletter gives you unique insight into the changing world of high-end travel: Smarter Travel Agents, Emerging Markets and More — Skift New Luxury

>>Tune in to our first backstage podcast from Skift Forum Europe for insight on how the world is changing for travel — and how the industry is responding: Skift Backstage Podcast: Global Tourism in a Volatile Time

Ryan Wolkov

PRC Time Shares

Author: Ryan Wolkov

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